Nebraska Instructional Materials Collaborative

Because materials matter for all Nebraska students.

Science of Reading Professional Learning and Community of Practice Series

 

 

The Nebraska Department of Education (NDE), in partnership with TNTP, presents the Science of Reading Professional Learning and Community of Practice Series. The extended closure of school buildings shined a spotlight on the persistent inequities students—particularly those most vulnerable—experience each day. To address this urgent need, the NDE is offering a collaborative learning experience around reading science research for educators to reflect on current practices and discuss ways to take action to implement research-based instructional practices.

 

The four-part series will feature professional learning sessions (PL) and corresponding communities of practice (CoP) for those interested in deeper focus on implementation. Participants may choose to attend some or all sessions, and professional learning sessions will be recorded for those who are interested but unable to attend. The PL and CoPs are open to ESU staff, school leaders, teachers, and more. PL sessions are capped at 100 participants and CoPs are capped at 50 participants. Reserve your spot today!

 

Participants will receive meeting links upon registration. All materials and resources including a session recording will be available to registrants once the series concludes.

 

If you have questions, please contact Dr. Abby Burke ([email protected]).

 

Part 1

Science of Reading: Phonological Awareness & Phonics

Thursday, 11/5/2020

3:30-5:30 p.m. CST

PL #1

 

Register Here

Scientifically based reading instruction requires teaching five critical competencies: Phonological awareness, Phonics and word recognition, Fluency, Knowledge and vocabulary, Comprehension.

 

Participants will begin to explore what cognitive science tells us about how students learn to read. Specifically, participants will be able to explain the following key understandings:

  • Phonological awareness is a broad skill that includes identifying and manipulating units of oral language; phonemic awareness refers to the specific ability to focus on and manipulate individual sounds in spoken
  • Phonemic awareness has a direct and significant effect on learning to read and spell; it can and should be taught explicitly and
  • Phonics instruction teaches students the predictable relationships between sounds and the spellings that represent those sounds in written
  • Phonics should be taught to mastery and students need ample time to practice newly acquired skills both in and out of context, both in decoding and encoding words and their sound-spelling

Thursday, 11/12/2020

3:30-5:00 p.m. CST

CoP #1

 

Register Here

Participants will reflect on the PL session and the article. They will then reflect on their current practice and the foundational skills program being used in their school.

 

  • What parts of it meet the explicit and systematic standard layed out in the research?
  • What gaps do they see?
  • What actions can they take in a week, in a month, in a year to improve the foundational skills instruction for the students in their school?

Part 2

Science of Reading: Knowledge & Vocabulary

Thursday, 11/19/2020

3:30-5:00 p.m. CST

PL #2

 

Register Here

Participants will continue to explore what cognitive science tells us about how students learn to read. Specifically, participants will be able to explain the following key understandings:

 

  • The idea that exposing young students to complex content and ideas is not developmentally appropriate is a myth dispelled by reading science
  • Science, social studies and genre knowledge, and the associated vocabulary, play a huge role in students’ ability to comprehend what they
  • Students on track for college and career learn approximately 3,000 new vocabulary words each year; most words are learned through exposure and word learning is most efficient when the context is
  • Leveled reading can create inequity because it can exclude students from the knowledge and vocabulary they need to become successful

Thursday, 12/3/2020

3:30-5:00 p.m. CST

CoP #2

 

Register Here

Participants will reflect on the PL session and the article. They will then reflect on their current practice and how the instructional materials they are currently using support the research by discussing these questions:

  • How do your current literacy teaching practices build content knowledge and vocabulary?
  • Do your instructional materials support coherent knowledge and vocabulary building? How?
  • What gaps do you see in your practice?
  • What gaps do you see in your instructional materials?
  • What actions can you take in a week, in a month, in a year to respond to this research and learning?

Part 3

Science of Reading: Comprehension & Fluency

Thursday, 12/10/2020

3:30-5:00 p.m. CST

PL# 3

 

Register Here

Participants will continue to explore what cognitive science tells us about how students learn to read. Specifically, participants will be able to explain the following key understandings:

 

  • The idea that reading is a set of strategies that can be taught in isolation and then applied to any text is a myth dispelled by reading science
  • Instead, all students should have access to complex text and reading instruction should focus on navigating the specific complexities of the text at hand (meaning/purpose, structure, and language features).
  • Leveled reading excludes students from practice navigating the features of complex text – the hallmark of proficient
  • Research points to some effective instructional supports and scaffolds to help struggling readers access complex text without compromising rigor or
  • Reading fluency refers to the ability of readers to read the words in text effortlessly and efficiently (automaticity) with meaningful expression that enhances the meaning of the text (prosody); fluency can and should be taught
  • Cognitive science research shows that fluency instruction and practice supports student to make the transition from basic decoding skill to reading that sounds like speech, freeing up mental energy to focus on

Thursday, 12/17/2020

3:30-5:00 p.m. CST

CoP #3

 

Register Here

Participants will reflect on the PL session and the article. They will then reflect on their current practice and how the instructional materials they are currently using support the research by discussing these questions:

  • How do your current literacy teaching practices build content knowledge and vocabulary?
  • Do your instructional materials support coherent knowledge and vocabulary building? How?
  • What gaps do you see in your practice?
  • What gaps do you see in your instructional materials?
  • What actions can you take in a week, in a month, in a year to respond to this research and learning?

Part 4

Analyzing & Responding to Data in Foundational Literacy

Thursday, 1/14/2021

3:30-5:00 p.m. CST

Training 4

 

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Participants will learn how to internalize data to pivot instruction and target lessons based on data. Specifically, participants will be able to:

  • Review the screener [TBD] to determine what skills are Compare that with Nebraska’s Essential Instructional Content for ELA/Literacy, the skills taught as part of the foundational skills curriculum, the skills that are not taught as part of the curriculum, and the skills that will have already been covered by the time the screening period has ended.
  • Interpret the data from a screener to determine what individual students know and what gaps they
  • Use this data and the screener/curriculum crosswalk to determine where you will need to take corrective action for individual students and where you will need to target your formative assessments during whole group

Thursday, 1/21/2021

3:30-5:00 p.m. CST

CoP #4

 

Register Here

Participants will reflect on the PL session and learn how to leverage the data for more targeted instruction. To plan their next steps, participants will reflect on the following questions:

  • What gaps do you see?
  • Are these gaps in the prioritized skills for this grade level? The previous grade level?
  • Will the curriculum cover those skills?
    • If no, what is your plan to take action?
    • If yes, how can you target your whole group instruction to ensure you are using this formative data?